LEARNING DIFFERENCES

OUR PROGRAMMES

LEARNING DIFFERENCES

OUR PARTNERS

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-SAN FRANCISCO

FACTS & FIGURES

 

Missing information

 

 

AWARD DETAILS

For information about this grant, please visit our Grant Database.

 

 

 

STRATEGIC PRIORITY AREA

2.  Engage students

4.  Personalise learning

6.  Explore learner profile

 

 

 

SPECIAL TOPIC COVERED

- 1 in 5

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Article

 

In the media

 

CONNECT WITH US

 

Contact person for Oak LDP grant

Name: Dr. Fumiko Hoeft

Position: Cognitive neuroscientist

Email: Fumiko.Hoeft@ucsf.edu

 

 

Website & social media links

“Our Oak-funded work examines the impact of mentoring to identify important ways to help bolster and understand the unique experiences of those with learning differences – ultimately, we hope to help such students realize their incredible value, power, and potential to succeed.”

– Fumiko Hoeft, MD, PhD, Principal Investigator

 

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

What have you accomplished through your Oak-funded programme that you’re most proud to share with your colleagues?

 

We have succeeded in completing the pilot year of our project, which allowed for development of a socio-emotional resources guide and score report for participating students, tailored to those with learning differences. This year also allowed for identification of promising results associating mentoring with growth in constructs such as self-esteem in mentees. Finally, our Oak sponsorship allowed us to disseminate the topic and importance of our work through several presentations and articles highlighting our project.

 

 

What’s the most interesting challenge your Oak-funded programme currently faces?

 

Learning differences exist on a continuum, and our project population is additionally socio-economically, culturally, and geographically diverse. Accordingly, we have learned to make our survey and outreach materials flexible, adaptive, and accessible to individuals from a variety of backgrounds.

 

 

The University of California-San Francisco’s Laboratory for Educational Neuroscience (brainLENS) combines cutting-edge, cross-disciplinary research methods with a deep passion for maximizing children’s potential in life, particularly stemming from the academic domain. Its grant is addressing a gap in the field of mentoring research by allowing brainLENS to evaluate whether and how students with learning differences benefit from a mentorship programme.

Assessing the Impact of Mentoring on Students with Learning Differences

ABOUT THE ORGANISATION

 

BrainLENS, structured within the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Psychiatry and Dyslexia Center and led by Dr. Fumiko Hoeft, integrates the latest brain imaging techniques, genetic analysis, and computational approaches to examine processes of learning. UCSF is the only institution in the US, and internationally, ranking within the top five for both research and primary care. Its institutions, including brainLENS, are also remarkably adept at and committed to translating research into educational practice. brainLENS is comprised of approximately 25 full- and part-time members with expertise in neuroscience, psychiatry, neuropsychology, cognitive psychology, and education. Its research accomplishments include discoveries such as: (1) the brain markers of pre-readers at-risk for developing dyslexia; (2) the brain networks involved in character traits such as grit and growth mindset; and (3) the brain mechanisms underlying stealth dyslexia (dyslexia which is masked because the child’s cognitive skills compensate to the degree that the student performs in the “average” range).

 

 

 

ABOUT THE OAK FUNDED  PROJECT

 

With Oak’s support, brainLENS is studying whether mentoring programs impart measurable impact on the social-emotional development, resilience, and academic performance of mentees with learning differences. Eye to Eye, another Oak Foundation partner, manages a nationwide mentoring program by and for young people with learning differences. Through the neuroscientific evaluation of Eye to Eye’s mentees, brainLENS is exploring how mentoring affects those who learn differently compared to their typically-developing peers, and which factors within a mentoring programme predict better outcomes. Its grant will also support the national and international dissemination of its research results, as well as the development of free resources that will aid mentoring programmes in deepening their impact on young people who learn differently.

 

 

 

OAK FOUNDATION

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Oak Foundation commits its resources to address issues of global, social and environmental concern, particularly those that have a major impact on the lives of the disadvantaged. With offices in Europe, Africa, India and North America, we make grants to organisations in approximately 40 countries worldwide.

 

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