LEARNING DIFFERENCES

OUR PROGRAMMES

LEARNING DIFFERENCES

OUR PARTNERS

GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY

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STRATEGIC PRIORITY AREA

1.  Strengthen teacher capacity

4. Personalised learning

 

 

 

SPECIAL TOPIC COVERED

- Metacognition

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Abstract

 

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Contact person for Oak LDP grant

Name: Candice Goerger
Position:

Email: cgoerger@gsu.edu

 

 

Website

A team of neuroscience and educational researchers from around the country, led by Georgia State University, seeks to understand why some people with dyslexia do not see significant improvements in reading after participation in an intensive, gold-standard literacy intervention. Funding from Oak will allow the team to compare the impact of two different reading intervention programs, deepening the impact of the research, and potentially contributing to more personalized dyslexia intervention strategies tailored to individual learners.

Identifying Dyslexia Interventions for Treatment Resisters

ABOUT THE ORGANISATION

 

A team of scientists from around the country, led by Georgia State University’s Dr. Robin Morris, are conducting a 5-year study to understand the neurocognitive and instructional basis of dyslexic “treatment resisters,” and to identify options that will improve their academic and social-emotional outcomes. Neuroscience and integrated education-relevant research has made significant strides in the last 10 years, largely through the use of functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) and other brain-related imaging techniques which have allowed scientists to measure brain activity while persons are learning and reading. These new technologies have led to a growing body of research that demonstrates both structural and functional brain differences between typically-developing readers and those with dyslexia. But there is still little known about the neurocognitive basis for the learning differences of readers with dyslexia who have limited responses to high-quality literacy interventions, a group sometimes called “treatment resisters.” We do not yet know which instructional or neurocognitive factors interact to distinguish the treatment resisters from their dyslexic peers who improve in a literacy intervention program, or what types of alternate interventions could lead to a breakthrough for treatment resisters. This 5-year study, funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), seeks to shed light on this question.

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE OAK FUNDED  PROJECT

 

The original study was designed to offer study participants two different reading interventions to identify whether a treatment resister to one intervention had a similar or different treatment response to a demonstrably different reading intervention program. Due to budget limitations, however, the second intervention was not included in the final study, significantly limiting the potential translation of the findings into real-world solutions for children. With Oak’s support, Dr. Morris’ team are reinstating the second intervention component, and thus strengthen the applicability of the entire research project. The team is also introducing small pilot treatment-focused projects that may demonstrate trends that could inform next steps for researchers and educators.

 

OAK FOUNDATION

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Oak Foundation commits its resources to address issues of global, social and environmental concern, particularly those that have a major impact on the lives of the disadvantaged. With offices in Europe, Africa, India and North America, we make grants to organisations in approximately 40 countries worldwide.

 

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